Live :: Location :: Mobile :: Recording

About ToneZone

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The original ToneZone was formed in Glasgow, Scotland circa 1985, serving the live concert sound market in Scotland.

Co-owner, Paul McKeown, built his first sound system in 1973 and had been a force in the local rental market since 1975. Previously (and still) a musician, he eventually realized that eating regularly was somewhat desireable, switched sides of the mix console, and became one of the people he formerly gave all his money to.

ToneZone underwent rapid growth and became a major sound company in the area, regularly touring in the UK and Europe.

Paul emigrated to the USA in 1996, working as a freelance sound engineer, touring in the USA, Canada and Europe. During this period, he built a small studio in his home to enable his wife, musician Donna Long, to record a solo piano album. This proved to be the seed for a growing interest in computer recording, which at the time was undergoing explosive expansion.

The medium has finally come of age, and it is now possible to carry in the trunk of a small car the recording power it would have taken a truck to house fifteen years previously. Undreamed-of quality and reliability is available to the average musician, and the vastly simplified logistics of live recording today make the process remarkably inexpensive.

Additionally, the portability of the hardware makes it possible to record in places unavailable or extremely difficult to utilize previously - your church, your living room, your garage, your school, even your back yard!

For the local band or performer, this is important, because live shows are paying less now than they did ten years ago, and the live music market is drying up. This means that affordable recording, enabling a step up to a larger audience, is more important than ever before. Paul is willing apply all his hard-won experience and skills to recording a quality product attainable for every performer.

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